The Ladies Who Blog

So I was adding to this blog my list of Blogs I Read, and they include:

The Blog Maven

The Yarn Harlot

SouleMama

Frontier Dreams

A Year on the Farm

Now if I could just find blogs called The Kitchen Witch and The Schoolmarm, you would have a picture of 90% of my life through blog names alone.  (I’m intentionally leaving out The T.V. Junkie–my guiltiest pleasure.)

So I got to thinking about these ladies who blog–not just the 3 I named up there, but also Woolly Moss Roots, Bird and Little Bird, Small Things, and many others that I’m only just beginning to discover.  We’re all living and blogging about homesteading or, at the least, a “back to nature” approach to life.

Our subjects are centuries-old pursuits: knitting, sewing, spinning, writing, reading, gardening, farming, child-rearing, housekeeping, cooking.  But we’re talking about these things through this technologically advanced wonder-machine under my fingers.

My thoughts on this dichotomy were put to words well when I met a fellow teacher recently and told her about the blogs I like to read.  “They’re mostly earth-mama, back to the land types,” I said.  “And these people use computers?!!” she exclaimed.  “Yes, and quite well,” I told her.  (She had never even read a blog, so there!)

Our pursuits have been practiced and refined over millennia, but we learn about them and discuss them via a technology that’s just a few decades old.  What advances are ladies (and some men, I know, but primarily ladies) making in these pursuits by having such a fast and easy way to share our work and ideas?

In my home, there are no video games, no MP3 players, no iPods, no iPhones, no blue-ray disc player, no TiVO or other digital video recorder.  We get by just fine without all that fancy electronic gadgetry, but we could never give up this slim little rectangle and the wireless modem that connects it, and me through it, to all of you.

I know there are homesteading, organic-living women out there without even an Internet connection (or maybe even a computer) but I don’t know any of them.  How would I meet them?

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Fall Bucket List, updated

Go to the Georgia National Fair.   This is the supremo county/state fair.  It’s called national because people come from all over the US to enter their livestock, arts and crafts, foods, etc.  The midway is always spectacular, and the setting at the fairgrounds in Perry, Georgia (you might have noticed it if you ever traveled I-75 through middle Georgia) is lovely.

Go to at least one craft fair.   Done.  We had a lovely time at the Pine Log Craft Fair at lovely little Pine Log United Methodist Church in Pine Log, Georgia.  Yes, there are a lot of pine trees in the area.

Go to a chili cook-off and serve as an unrecognized judge.

Go on a hayride.

Go camping at least once and have hot dogs and hot chocolate around the campfire.

Get the Halloween pumpkin from a pumpkin farm, carve it, and roast the seeds.

Knit a new sweater for L’Oiseau.

Go hiking and collect acorns for acorn crafts.

Go to a high school football game.  Okay, found out that local high school games cost about $8 – $10 to attend.  Fuhgettaboutit!  I used to pay $2.50 to see a game. 

What’s on YOUR bucket list for the Fall?

Fall Bucket List

Go to at least one craft fair.

Pick apples at B.J.Reece Apple Orchards in Ellijay, Georgia.

Go to a chili cook-off and serve as an unrecognized judge.

Go on a hayride.

Go camping at least once and have hot dogs and hot chocolate around the campfire.

Get the Halloween pumpkin from a pumpkin farm, carve it, and roast the seeds.

Knit a new sweater for L’Oiseau.

Go hiking and collect acorns for acorn crafts.

Go to a high school football game.

What’s on YOUR bucket list for the fall?